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Press Releases

Scott Orsini Joins Unified Power as New Vice President of Business Development

TERRELL, Texas, February 3, 2020 – Unified Power is pleased to announce Scott Orsini as our new Vice President of Business Development. Scott joins Unified Power’s Business Development team after 20+ years working in the mission critical services industry. His responsibilities include development of new accounts, growth within existing accounts, and the sale of critical power services and products.

“Scott brings a comprehensive understanding of account and project management to our team,” said Robert Parrish, Executive Vice President of Sales & Marketing. “His years of industry experience will allow him to approach opportunities and offer the best solution with the client in mind.”

Scott accepts this position after progressive growth within operations management positions, ultimately leading to an executive role. His past responsibilities have included: creating, developing, and managing national sales and service operations of electrical and mechanical infrastructures, direct engagement with strategic customers, and oversight of administrative, project, and field staff.

Before joining Unified Power, Scott was Chief Operating Officer of a leading predictive analytics company focused on providing power systems data to the telecommunications industry. Mr. Orsini also co-founded Lionheart Power Systems, a successful independent service provider with a local and national presence.

“Unified Power is a dynamic player in the business services industry whose customer-centric focus, operational, and technical standards of excellence align deeply with my professional standards,” says Mr. Orsini.

The Unified Power brand began in January 2011 when On Computer Services, a national critical power service company located in Terrell, Texas, invested heavily into systems, product training, technical support, and parts logistics in order to maximize the service experience and reduce risk for its rapidly expanding group of Fortune 500 customers.

Part of Incline Investments, LLC. portfolio, the Unified Power strategy has been well received in the marketplace, catapulting Unified Power to continued double-digit growth while maintaining a world-class service quality rating. Currently providing services to more than 5,000 customers, the company is well capitalized and aggressively seeking to acquire additional customer-focused, critical power service companies that share the vision.

Under various brands, Unified Power has provided thousands of companies across the nation with affordable and reliable critical power services for their UPS, DC Plant, and battery systems for more than two decades.

Companies operating under the Unified Power brand include Power Protection Unlimited (Maryland), Sun Sales Company (New Mexico), UPSCO (Ohio), Power Protection Services (Texas), Critical Power USA (Maryland), 24/7 Technology (Georgia), SEPS Power (Illinois), the UPS division of LionHeart Power Systems (Illinois), and CORE Power Systems (California).

Press Releases

Unified Power Acquires Core Power Services, Inc.

In continuing with its mission to bring customers the largest and most advanced critical power service company in the U.S., Unified Power is proud to announce the acquisition of Core Power Services, Inc.

Formed in 1992 by Bernardo Mercado and his brother Ernesto near the San Francisco Bay Area, Core Power Services, Inc. provides independent, professional services to users of power conditioning equipment such as Uninterruptible Power Supplies, Power Distribution Units, Static Switches, and Stationary Batteries. Their goal is to provide the highest possible level of customer service and technical support with their highly skilled team of field engineers.

Based just outside of Dallas in Terrell, Texas, Unified Power provides companies across the nation with affordable and reliable critical power services for their UPS’s, DC Plants, Inverters, Battery Systems, PDU’s, Generators, and ATS’s for more than two decades. Like Core Power, Unified Power not only delivers proven technical competency, but a commitment to customizing the solutions and services that are in the best interest of each individual customer.

The Unified Power brand began in January 2011 when On Computer Services, a national critical power service company began seeking mergers with high-quality, reputable critical power services providers across the nation. In November 2019, Core Power Services became the 11th entity to join Unified Power thereby creating a much stronger presence in Northern California.

Today, Unified Power supports over 6,000 customer sites, and the company continues to grow via its commitment to market-leading customer service and continued focus on acquiring relationships with entrepreneurs like Bernardo and Ernesto Mercado.

Companies under the Unified Power brand include On-Computer Services, Power Protection Unlimited (PPU), Sun Sales, PowerPlus (UPS Services division), UPSCO, Power Protection Services (PPS), Lionheart Services (UPS Services division), 247 Technologies, Critical Power USA, SEPS, and Core Power Services.

UPS

Line-interactive vs Online UPS: Which system is right for you?

When selecting an uninterruptible power system (UPS), determining the optimal topology is one of the most important considerations. Because a standby UPS offers only the most basic level of protection, the majority of organizations choose to deploy either a line-interactive or a double-conversion online model. Before making this decision, it is important to understand the differences between the two topologies. Consider the following five key factors:

1. Your power environment. A line-interactive system conditions and regulates AC utility power, shielding connected equipment from five of the nine most common power problems: blackouts, sags, surges, and under- and over-voltage conditions. These models are best suited for applications where utility power is, for the most part, consistently clean. In facilities where the AC line voltage is unstable, distorted or fluctuates wildly, line-interactive UPSs will often resort to their batteries, which can reduce available runtime for an extended outage as well as require frequent battery replacement.

In applications where the power quality is less stable, an online UPS is generally the preferred solution, as it is the only type of UPS that completely isolates connected equipment from raw utility power by converting power from AC to DC and then back to AC. As such, the topology safeguards equipment from all nine common power problems; in addition to those protected by a line-interactive UPS, the online model also remedies electrical line noise, frequency variations, switching transients and harmonic distortion.

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2. The equipment being protected. When determining the optimal UPS topology, it is essential to consider the equipment it will be tasked with protecting. How sensitive are the devices? Are they critical to your organization’s availability and uptime? Knowing these basic requirements will go a long way toward establishing the topology that will best serve the application. Keep in mind that a double-conversion online UPS is the only topology to offer zero transfer time to the battery, making it ideal for sensitive and mission-critical equipment. And because this type of unit safeguards equipment from all nine common power problems, it affords the highest level of protection.

3. Your capacity requirements. How much equipment are you expecting to protect with your UPS? Generally speaking, line-interactive models extend up to around 5000 VA. Above this capacity, the topology has historically been impractical due to its larger size and greater cost. Conversely, double-conversion online models are rarely considered below 750 VA because line-interactive is more practical for smaller loads. However, when it comes to selecting a UPS within the 750 to 5000 VA power range, the functional and economic advantages of each topology aren’t always so clear-cut. Choosing the best topology within this overlap range will depend on the specifics of the installation, as well as weighing all advantages and possible shortfalls.

4. Financial ramifications. When considering the monetary investment required by the two topologies, it is critical to take into account not only the upfront price tag, but also the costs of potential downtime. For mission-critical facilities, the cost of downtime should be paramount in deciding what level of protection is required. Although a line-interactive system may be less expensive, it will not provide the same level of protection as an online system — leaving equipment more vulnerable to damage and the organization more susceptible to downtime.

5. Total cost of ownership. Another financial factor to think through is the ongoing operating and service costs that each topology requires. For instance, a double-conversion online UPS will consume more energy over time than a line-interactive model, which operates with greater efficiency. In addition to higher electricity demands, online models also produce more heat, which translates to a need for extra cooling. While these may seem like nominal charges, they can add up if an organization deploys multiple UPSs across an enterprise, or even when considering the total lifetime energy consumption of one unit. And while line-interactive UPS systems protect connected devices during a complete power outage, they don’t safeguard sensitive equipment against all power anomalies, which can lead to degradation and premature equipment failure. Service requirements can also vary between the two topologies, with certain design aspects that theoretically increase or decrease operating life and reliability.

As you can see, there is no single answer or distinct deduction when deciding between line-interactive and online UPS topologies. If you’re still weighing the pros and cons and trying to determine the optimal solution for your environment, give Unified Power a call. We would be happy to help establish the ideal power protection solution for the unique requirements of your organization and applications.

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Education, UPS

Knowledge is Power: 5 Key Truths about UPS Systems

Whether you’re considering upgrading your uninterruptible power system (UPS), investigating service options for an existing unit, or simply seeking to bolster your overall power protection proficiency, one thing is certain: knowledge is power. With that in mind, we’ve compiled five important details to add to your power system repertoire:

1. All UPS are not created equal. It is important to recognize that the three primary UPS topologies — standby, line-interactive and online —provide significant differences in performance and varying degrees of protection. A standby system, also referred to as an off-line or passive UPS, delivers the most basic level of security, making it best suited for less critical applications. While the low-cost units supply battery backup during a power outage, they do not buffer equipment against many common damaging power anomalies.

A line-interactive UPS system is designed to shield connected devices from five of the nine most common power problems, including under- and over- voltage conditions. Typically used to safeguard enterprise network and IT applications, a line-interactive UPS provides more protection than standby models, with better power conditioning and regulation that helps prolong battery life.

Finally, the online or double-conversion topology delivers continuous protection against all nine common power problems, supplying consistent power quality regardless of incoming instabilities. Online UPSs are the optimal choice for critical applications or those involving highly sensitive equipment, such as data centers, communications hubs and other mission-critical installations where continuous, clean power is a business-critical requirement.

2. A UPS won’t necessarily include power conditioning. While either device can offer various forms of power filtering, the primary distinction between the two is that a UPS system has a battery, while a power conditioner does not. In addition to providing battery backup, some UPSs also combine power filtering into a single unit; however, the UPS must be either line-interactive or online topology and include true sine wave output. However, if your UPS doesn’t incorporate the necessary level of power conditioning, it is possible to add a separate power conditioner to the unit.

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3. No matter how well you care for your UPS, certain components will eventually fail. While some UPS systems may last 15 or more years, there are several principal components that are subject to failure far earlier; most notably, the batteries, fans and capacitors. The majority of UPS batteries have an expected lifespan of three to five years under ambient conditions, but can fail much faster in environments that exceed a temperature of 77°F, or where recurrent power problems cause them to cycle frequently. Fans have a typical lifespan of six to seven years, and most capacitors will last seven to 10 years before needing to be replaced. To avoid unexpected downtime or damage to critical equipment, make sure you understand the lifecycle and maintenance requirements of these key UPS components.

4. Regular preventive maintenance is essential. Routine preventive maintenance has been shown to be one of the most successful and cost-effective ways to ensure the longevity — and reliability — of your UPS system. This proactive maintenance approach monitors ongoing UPS health through regular checkups, helping to ensure that the system will continue to operate at peak performance. In addition to batteries, capacitors and fans, a UPS’s semi-conductors, wiring, resistors and breakers all require regular attention in order to achieve optimal performance and efficiency. Without scheduled preventive maintenance, there is no way to mitigate the possibility of part and component failures, leaving equipment vulnerable to downtime and premature failure.

5. Maximizing UPS efficiency can lower your energy costs. Did you know that even small boosts to UPS efficiency can result in thousands of dollars in savings? That’s because high-efficiency UPS models achieve more real power while lowering power and cooling requirements— an especially important factor considering utility costs are long-term, ongoing expenses. While actual savings depend on utility rates, the size of the UPS system and the load supported, increasing efficiency by as little as 1 percent can translate to tens of thousands of dollars in annual savings. And the Department of Energy estimates that a 15,000-square-foot data center operating at 100W/square foot would pocket $90,000 per year just by increasing the efficiency of its UPS from 90 to 95 percent.

While these key factors are intended to bolster your overall UPS system knowledge, we at Unified Power also understand that UPS’s can be complex devices.

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DC Power

The Main Components of a DC Power System

While the majority of power infrastructure operates on AC (alternating current) power, certain applications and industries are better suited for DC (direct current), especially those that require either a long duration discharge or low amperage output over an extended period of time. This is due to the fact that with DC power, the current consistently flows in one direction. Conversely, with AC power, the electric current periodically reverses direction. DC power is widely used in applications such as telecom, automotive, aircraft and other low-voltage, low-current applications.

In a DC power system, the uninterruptible power system (UPS) takes in primary power — usually utility AC — and outputs DC voltage while providing backup power from the integrated batteries in the event of an extended power outage. Although DC units may vary depending on the type of application they are designed for, most systems consist of five main components:  

1. Rectifier / Charger — An electrical device that converts alternating current, the rectifier has two main purposes. Its primary job is to provide DC power to the supported loads, with a secondary role of charging and maintaining the batteries to ensure the system will perform in the event of a power failure. When selecting a rectifier, consider whether the system that is being backed up requires redundancy, efficiency and/or scalability.

2. Controller – The brains of a DC power system, the controller provides logic to the system, commanding the various components and providing insight into the UPS’s status and functionality. Some DC systems may have a separate controller. To ensure compatibility, the controller must be able to communicate with the network; for instance, tie into a building automation system or connect via SNMP or another communication protocol.

3. Batteries — Depending on the application, a DC system may use VRLA, lithium-ion, NICAD or wet cell batteries, with almost all batteries running in a series due to the amount of power needed. Selecting a battery type will depend on a number of factors, including whether a long duration discharge is needed, the environment of the facility (such as high heat or humidity), life cycle cost and any footprint limitations at the site.

4. Distribution system — Many DC applications have specific requirements around distribution, with one of the most common considerations being future load requirements. The distribution is usually integrated into the rectifier enclosure, but it can also be external.

5. Enclosure — There are a variety of enclosure designs available for DC systems, including rack-mount and shelf-mount. In some installations, batteries are included within the enclosure, while other times they are deployed in a separate rack.

When choosing the optimal DC power system for your environment, it is important to take into account all of these considerations. Since DC UPSs can differ depending on the application they are intended for, it is critical to understand the critical system components to ensure your backup solution will perform as expected.

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